Survey Says: Twitter Professional Development (PD) Evaluation

Five or so years ago, I opened a Twitter account BUT never did anything with it and that account is lying dormant out there somewhere to this day. A few months ago, I thought I’d give it another try. This time it stuck.

One day while Twitter lurking, I happened on a teacher chat discussing PLNs. I tweeted, “What is a PLN?” I don’t know who replied, but he answered with Professional Learning Network and I have been hooked since.

Saving the exciting details of how it all began for another blog post, a discussion has been brewing on Twitter as to its role in professional development and the resulting effect on student learning. Therefore, I decided to develop a brief survey to further open up the dialog.

For something to chew on and before you complete the 10 question survey, consider an island excursion–a 3-minute tour–if you will.

This is the link to Tom Whitby’s blog, My Island View, and his post–If Twitter is not PD, what is it?.

http://tomwhitby.wordpress.com/2013/04/03/if-twitter-is-not-pd-what-is-it/

The survey is here: THANK YOU!!

http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/SYVQ837

Please note: It is understood this survey is rudimentary at best (I do not own SMPro), but with the input of @tomwhitby  and @twhitford as well as Kim Shelley, math department head at Staley High School in North Kansas City, I think we were able to put together a survey which should generate some useful, albeit, anecdotal data.

Enjoy and please feel free to share your thoughts here as well! This survey will remain open until 5 p.m. CST, Tuesday, April 9, 2013.

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Do students benefit when the teacher tweets?

In addition, if you know of any empirical data about Twitter as a PD tool, please let us know! We’d love to read  and share.

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About barbarawmadden

I began teaching in 1981, but after a few years decided staying home with my children was what was best for my family. After almost 20 years raising four children, I returned to the classroom in 2005.

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